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Lecturers
Not complete --> last updated 07/13/06

Biographies
Ceccato, Pietro
IRI-Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory,
Columbia University


Pietro Ceccato trained originally as an agronomist and soil science scientist. He spent two years in Central African Republic working with local communities to improve agricultural practices. He obtained a Master in Environmental Management using decision-support systems and worked as a research scientist at the Natural Resources Institute in United Kingdom. He developed remote sensing products to monitor active fires and vegetation status for assessing the risk of fire occurrence. He worked at the European Commission Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy) on the use of remote sensing to monitor vegetation status and used this work to obtain his PhD in Remote Sensing (2001, University of Greenwich, UK). Pietro then joined the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (Rome, Italy) to develop an early warning system for Desert Locust monitoring. He developed remote sensing products and Geographical Information Systems to be used operationally by the Ministries of Agriculture in 21 countries in Africa and Asia.
Pietro joined the International Research Institute for Climate and Society in 2004. His current research activities include the development and integration of environmental remote sensing products into early warning systems for human health, pest management and fire risk.

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Collins, William
NCAR

Bill is a Scientist III in the Climate & Global Dynamics Division at NCAR. his research interests include:
Interactions of clouds with solar and terrestrial radiation; interactions of aerosols with solar and terrestrial radiation; role of clouds and aerosols in global climate change; development of new methods for modeling global aerosols; development of new methods for modeling clouds in GCM's.

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Ebi, Kris
ESS, LLC

Dr. Kristie L. Ebi is an independent consultant based in Alexandria, VA.  Dr. Ebi is an epidemiologist who has worked in the field of global climate change for 10 years.  Her research focuses on potential impacts of climate variability and change, including impacts associated with extreme events, thermal stress, food-borne diseases, and vector-borne diseases, and on the design of adaptation response options to reduce current and projected future negative impacts.  She is chief editor of the book “Integration of Public Health with Adaptation to Climate Change: Lessons Learned and New Directions.”  She is a Lead Author for the Human Health chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report.  She was a Convening Lead Author on the WHO publication: Methods of Assessing Human Health Vulnerability and Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change, and she has been Lead Author in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change.  Dr. Ebi has more than 25 years of multidisciplinary experience in environmental issues, and has more than 50 publications.  Dr. Ebi’s scientific training includes a M.S. in toxicology and a Ph.D. and MPH in epidemiology, and two years of postgraduate research in epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

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Hayden, Mary
University of Colorado @ Denver

I am currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs working with on an NSF funded study underway in Denver and Austin: “The Warning Project: Geographical and Psychological Components to Understand Warning Response and Improve Warning Messages for Short-Fuse Weather Events”. I am a co-PI for a NOAA funded study currently in its fourth year investigating the role of climate variability on the potential for dengue fever to emerge along the US/Mexico border. I have professional training in the health and behavioral sciences (Ph.D.) and geography (climatology, M.A.) and my research interests include community-focused interventions, infectious disease ecology, and the role of human-environmental interactions on disease transmission, particularly dengue fever and West Nile Virus. I have worked as a science mentor for undergraduate students in Climate and Health at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and I am a member of the scientific advisory board for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project.

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Johnson, Sandy
University of Denver

Currently at the University of Denver , I was a Visiting Scientist at NCAR, which was hosting me while I was away from the Louisiana State University School of Public Health where I was a Professor of Epidemiology. I began my career in communications before turning to development and public health. I hold a Ph.D. from Tulane University where my focus was on international health and development, infectious disease epidemiology, and medical anthropology. My B.A. was a double-major in the completely unrelated fields of Film Production and East Asian Studies. My research interests include the interaction of social policy, environmental change (including climate change!) and health; and development and conflict. I have conducted research in Latin America and Asia . As you might expect, I therefore love travel. What you might not otherwise expect is that Buffy the Vampire Slayer is my personal hero.

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Kovats, Sari
LSHTM

Sari Kovats is a Lecturer in Environmental Epidemiology and is an expert on the assessment of the current and potential impacts of climate on human population health. As part of the EU-funded CCASSH project on developing adaptation strategies to reduce the health the impacts of climate change in Europe , and the current EUROHEAT project, she is working on the prevention the health impacts of weather extremes. Sari been an expert advisor since 1996 on climate variability, climate change and health for WHO Geneva, and the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health ( Rome ). Sari is currently a Lead Author in Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and has worked extensively on previous assessments for the IPCC.

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Mearns, Linda, Senior Scientist
NCAR

Linda O. Mearns is  Director of the Institute for the Study of Society and the Environment at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado.  She holds a M.A. and Ph.D. in Geography/Climatology from UCLA.  She has performed research and published in the areas of crop-climate interactions, climate change scenario formation, climate change impacts on agro-ecosystems, uncertainty in regional climate projections, and  analysis of climate variability and extreme climate events in both observations and and climate models.  She has particularly worked extensively with regional climate models. She has most recently published papers on exploring the effect of different spatial scales of climate change scenarios on determination of agricultural and economic impacts of climate change, and probabilities of regional climate change. She has also published a series of articles on the effects of changes in climate variability (in contrast to changes in mean climate) on simulated crop yields. She has contributed to or been a Lead Author in the IPCC Climate Change 1992, 1995, and 2001 Reports on the subjects of climate variability in general circulation models, impacts of climate change on agriculture, regional projections of climate change, and climate change scenario development. She is a member of the IPCC Task Group on Scenarios for Climate Impact Assessment, and is Lead Author for the chapter on  Regional Projections of Climate Change in IPCC Working Group 1 for the IPCC Fourth  Assessment Report, and a Lead Author on  chapter 2 in Working Group 2 on  New Assessment Methods.   She is also participating in several Synthesis Products of the US CCSP.  She is a member of the NRC Climate Research Committee (CRC) and Human Dimensions of Global Change (HDGC) Committee. She was made a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society in  January 2006.  

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Meehl, Gerald A., Senior Scientist
NCAR

Gerald Meehl received his Bachelor's (1974), Master's (1978), and Ph.D. (1987) degrees in climate dynamics from the University of Colorado in Boulder.  Since 1973, he has worked at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in various capacities, including participating in the Tropical Wind Energetics Reference Level Experiment (TWERLE) in Pago Pago, American Samoa, and Christchurch, New Zealand (1975--76), in the Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) in Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, and Kathmandu, Nepal (1978--79), and in the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) in Townsville, Australia, Kapingamarangi, FSM, Pohnpei, FSM, and Republic of Nauru (1992--93).  Since 1979, as a scientist in the Climate and Global Dynamics Division, he has studied the interactions between El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian monsoon, analyzed the results from global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models at NCAR, and examined the possible effects of increased carbon dioxide, sulfate aerosols, and other forcings on global climate.  He is the author of more than 130 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals, and has contributed chapters to several textbooks.  He was a contributing author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1990 and 1992 assessments, a lead author for the chapter on climate model projections of future climate change for the 1995 IPCC assessment, a coordinating lead author for the chapter on climate model projections of future climate change for the IPCC Third Assessment Report published in 2001, and a coordinating lead author for the chapter on global climate change projections for the upcoming IPCC Fourth Assessment Report.  Among his current committee appointments, he is a member of National Research Council Climate Research Committee, co-chair of the Community Climate System Model Climate Change Working Group, co-chair of the World Climate Research Programme CLIVAR Working Group on Coupled Models (WGCM),  chairman of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP), and chairman of the WGCM Climate Simulation Panel which is coordinating analyses of global coupled climate model simulations for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report

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Moore, Chet
CSU


Dr. Moore is a Professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences with a joint appointment in the Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management at Colorado State University, in Fort Collins, Colorado. He is physically located in the Arthropod-borne & Infectious Diseases Laboratory on the CSU Foothills Campus. His research focuses on the application of geographic information systems, remote sensing, and related technologies to vector-borne and zoonotic diseases of human and veterinary public health importance; vector-borne disease models; and the impact of invasive species on disease systems.

Prior to his retirement from federal service, Dr. Moore was Supervisory Research Entomologist and GIS Coordinator in the Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, located in Fort Collins, Colorado. He received his BS, MS, and PhD degrees from the University of California, Davis.

Dr. Moore is the author/co-author of over 60 research papers or book chapters, and has received numerous government and professional society awards. He is a past-president of the American Mosquito Control Association, the Society for Vector Ecology, and the West-Central Mosquito and Vector Control Association.

Dr. Moore also is President of Vector Biology and Control International, an independent consulting firm that provides training and consultation on the biology and control of vector-borne diseases. VBCI provides on-site training, develops tailored training manuals and other material, and assists agencies in developing effective surveillance, prevention, and control programs. Emphasis is placed on rapid response and the use of current technology—such as GIS, GPS, and automated field data entry—to reduce personnel costs and speed up turnaround times.

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Patz, Jonathan
University of Wisconsin @ Madison

Jonathan Patz, MD, MPH, is Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and also an Affiliate Scientist of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

He has served as Co-chair for the health sector expert panel of the US National Assessment on Climate Variability and Change, Convening Lead Author for the United Nations/World Bank Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, and lead author on several United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and WHO monographs on climate change.  He is Co-Editor for the journal, Ecohealth: Conservation Medicine and Ecosystem Sustainability, and Co-editor of the textbook, Ecosystem Change and Public Health: A Global Perspective (2001), and has written over 60 peer-reviewed papers addressing the health effects of global environmental change.

From 1996-2000, he was principal investigator for the largest US multi-institutional study on climate change health risks and has briefed the US Congress, Administration, and federal agency leaders. His areas of research investigation include effects of climate change on heat waves, air pollution and water- and vector-borne diseases, as well as links between deforestation and malaria in the Amazon.

He has earned medical board certification in both Occupational/Environmental Medicine and Family Medicine and received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University and his Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from Johns Hopkins University. In 2005, he received an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellows Award.

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Pulwarty, Roger
NOAA

Roger S. Pulwarty is a research scientist at the NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center in Boulder, CO.   Roger's interests are in climate and weather, their role in society-environment interactions, and in the design of effective services to address associated risks. His research and applications focus on natural resources policy, development and decision-making in the Western U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean. From 1998 to 2002 Dr. Pulwarty directed the NOAA/ OGP/Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program. Roger chairs the AMS Board on Societal Impacts, and is a lead author on the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report Working Group 2.

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Rawlins, Sam
Caribbean Epidemiology Center,
Port of Spain, Trinidad

Sam Rawlins is an emeritus Scientist (entomologist/parasitologist) with the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC), a PAHO/WHO centre located in Trinidad and Tobago, and dedicated to public health service of the 21 CAREC member countries (CMCs) of the Caribbean. Dr Rawlins recently retired from the CAREC after 15 years of service. Prior to this he was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Microbiology at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus in Jamaica. His area of specialty has been the surveillance and control of vector-borne diseases a subject on which he has published quite extensively. In the last few years, he has taken an interest in the area of climate change and variability impacting on arthropod vectors and on the diseases which they transmit. Dr Rawlins is a graduate of London University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and of the University of the West Indies.


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Smith, Joel
Stratus Consulting

Joel B. Smith is a Vice President with Stratus Consulting Inc. in Boulder, Colorado. Mr. Smith has been analyzing climate change impacts and adaptation issues for over 18 years. He was a Coordinating Lead Author for the Synthesis chapter on climate change impacts for the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a Lead Author for the U.S. National Assessment on climate change impacts.  He is a lead author on the current IPCC assessment. In addition, he was the technical coordinator on vulnerability and adaptation for the U.S. Country Studies Program, is the coordinator of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change series on Environment, and is or has provided technical guidance to the Electric Power Research Institute, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the United Nations, and to states and municipalities on a number of vulnerability assessments and adaptation projects.

Mr. Smith worked for the Environmental Protection Agency from 1984-92, where he was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Climate Change Division.  He is a co-editor of EPA's Report to Congress: The Potential Effects of Global Climate Change on the United States, published in 1989, As Climate Changes: International Impacts and Implications, published by Cambridge University Press in 1995, Adaptation to Climate Change: Assessments and Issues published by Springer-Verlag in 1996, Climate Change: Adaptive Capacity and Development, published in 2003 by Imperial College Press, and Integration of Public Health with Adaptation to Climate Change, published by Taylor & Francis in 2005.  He joined Hagler Bailly in 1992 and Stratus Consulting in 1998. He has published more than a twenty articles and chapters on climate change impacts and adaptation in peer reviewed journals and books.

Besides working on climate change issues at EPA, he also served as an analyst examining oceans and water regulations, and was a Special Assistant to the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation. Mr. Smith was a Presidential Management Intern in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 1982-1984.  He has also worked in the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Mr. Smith received a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Williams College in 1979, and in 1982, received a Master of Public Policy Degree from the University of Michigan.

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Tebaldi, Claudia
NCAR

Major Research:  Claudia Tebaldi is a Project Scientist II at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO, with a joint appointment in the Institute for the Study of Society and Environment, the Institute for Mathematics Applied to the Geosciences and the Climate and Global Dynamics division, in the Climate Change Research section.  She is focusing her research on the analysis and statistical characterization of climate change projections as derived from climate models, especially at the regional scale and as they relate to impacts studies. 

Education:  Her undergraduate degree is in Economics with emphasis in Statistics from Universita’ L. Bocconi in Milan, Italy. She received a Ph.D. in Statistics and Decision Sciences from Duke University. She was a post-doc in the Geophysical Statistics Project at NCAR.

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Trenberth, Kevin
NCAR

Dr. Kevin E. Trenberth is Head of the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. From New Zealand, he obtained his Sc. D. in meteorology in 1972 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a lead author of the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment of Climate Change and serves on the Scientific Steering Group for the Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) program and the Joint Scientific Committee of the World Climate Research Programme. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and American Association for Advancement of Science, and an honorary fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. In 2000 he received the Jule G. Charney award from the AMS and in 2003 he was given the NCAR Distinguished Achievement Award. Brief Biographical Sketch.

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Wilson, Mark
University of Michigan

Mark L. Wilson is Professor of Epidemiology and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, with a research and teaching focus on the social and environmental determinants of infectious disease risk and the impacts of globalization on health.  He is trained as an ecologist and epidemiologist with broad research interests in infectious diseases and etiologies, including the analysis of transmission dynamics, the evolution of vector-host-parasite systems, and the determinants of human risk.  Most projects address ecological and social variation in time and space as they impact on vector, reservoir and human populations and pathogen transmission dynamics Interactions with the environment underlie most of these studies.  Recent efforts have been directed at various "emerging" diseases including malaria and schistosomiasis in Africa, leishmaniasis in the Middle East, and dengue fever in South America.  Dr. Wilson currently is involved in training and research projects in the US, Kenya, Malawi, China, Egypt, Israel, and Peru.  As Director of the Global Health Program, he takes an active role in helping to design cross-disciplinary, international learning experiences for students who will be trained in how globalization affects the health of people throughout the world, particularly the disadvantaged and disenfranchised. 

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Wigley, Tom
NCAR

Tom Wigley is a Senior Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He is a U.S. citizen, born and educated in Australia where he trained as a meteorologist with the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology. His Ph.D. is in Theoretical Physics. He has published widely in the field of climatology and related sciences. He is the author of more than 200 refereed journal articles and book chapters, many of which are highly cited. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). His main current interests include projections of future climate and sea-level change, carbon-cycle modeling, the interpretation of past climate changes (including the detection of anthropogenic influences), climate modeling and model validation, and economic and policy aspects of mitigation (i.e., reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases). Wigley is the former Director of the Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia , Norwich , U.K.

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Wilkinson, Paul
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine,
University of London

Paul Wilkinson is an environmental epidemiologist and Head of the Public & Environmental Health Research Unit, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.  He trained in medicine and public health in the UK, and began epidemiological research at the National Heart & Lung Institute before moving to the London School in 1994.  His principal research interests are climate and health; the heath consequences of environmental change; and methods for assessing environmental hazards to health.

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