Education and Outreach

[ Aral Sea Encyclopedia Contribution ]
[ Case Studies of Forecast Value Web Site ]
[ Climate Affairs Program Development ] [ Clim-Econ Discussion List ]
[ El Niño Overview Publication ] [ ENSO Signal ]
[ Exploring the Concept of Climate Surprise ]
[ Geophysical Statistics Project (GSP) ]
[ Handbook of Weather, Climate, and Water, Societal Aspects Volume ]
[ Network Newsletter ] [ Societal Aspects of Weather Web Site ]
[ Weather Policy Resource Guide Electronic Forum ] [ WeatherZine ]

 

Aral Sea Encyclopedia Contribution

Michael Glantz made an invited contribution to the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, a five-volume set to be published by John Wiley and Sons that will be linked directly to its own Web site. The editors of the encyclopedia are Ted Munn (Editor-in-Chief, U Toronto, Canada) and Mostafa Tolba (Volume Editor, International Center for Environment and Development, Egypt). Glantz's contribution describes the Aral Sea and its demise as the worst human-caused environmental disaster of the twentieth century.

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Case Studies of Forecast Value Web Site

A Web site that categorizes recent case studies of the value of weather and climate forecasts is maintained and updated by Richard Katz. Originally developed by Shelly Knight (intern, U. Colorado, now NCAR/RAP), its scope is focused on prescriptive studies that obtain quantitative estimates of forecast value.

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Climate Affairs Program Development

Climate Affairs ProgramMichael Glantz has continued development of the Climate Affairs notion during FY00. He has given several presentations and seminars and held discussions at various universities in the United States and overseas. For example, in the United States Glantz has discussed the Climate Affairs notion with the City University of New York (CUNY) and Columbia University. Glantz also published an article, "Climate Affairs as a Next-Generation Environmental Science," with co-author Zafar Adeel (UN University, Tokyo) in Global Environmental Change. Given the tremendous impact that climate has on society and the environment, an academic program in Climate Affairs can help to prepare the next generation of researchers with a better understanding of research, application, and policy that centers on climate and climate-related issues. Glantz and Tom Windham (NCAR/SOARS) visited historic black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to discuss Climate Affairs program development. Glantz also submitted a proposal to prepare a "primer" on Climate Affairs to Island Press entitled "Climate and Social Dynamics." Glantz is also working the United Nations University (Zafar Adeel, Tokyo) and Michael Coughlan (WMO, Geneva) to develop a major proposal on Climate Affairs in developing countries. Their goal is to "educate the educators" about how climate influences human activities in their country.

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Clim-Econ Discussion List

The Economics of Climate Variability and Global Change list (Clim-Econ) is a moderated electronic discussion group, created and managed by Kathleen Miller, which serves to facilitate interdisciplinary discussion on the economic aspects of climate variability and change. The initial subscribers included the participants in the Institute on the Economics of the Climate Resource held at NCAR in June 1995. The list currently has more than 500 subscribers from around the world, including individuals with a variety of backgrounds and professional affiliations.

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El Niño Overview Publication

Michael Glantz prepared a chapter in a book edited by David Halpern (Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA), Satellites, Oceanography and Society (Halpern, 2000). This chapter, "Why Care about El Niño and La Niña?" gives a concise overview of many attributes of these events for presentation to various audiences, from university students to researchers in other disciplines, to policy makers, and to the public. It serves as a stand-alone model for use by educators to explain the El Niño phenomenon to multidisciplinary audiences in user-friendly terms.

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ENSO Signal

ENSO SignalNOAA's Office of Global Programs announced in December 1999 that ESIG would assume responsibility for the ENSO Signal, a quarterly newsletter that has educated and informed those interested in the ENSO cycle and its impacts on ecosystems and societies. During FY00, Michael Glantz and Managing Editor D. Jan Stewart produced three issues of the ENSO Signal. NOAA/OGP will continue to provide funds for dissemination of the newsletter. It remains available in hard copy and an electronic version.

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Exploring the Concept of Climate Surprise

Although long-term, incremental changes in climate can have serious consequences, it is usually the extreme, surprising events that cause the most damage to human health and property. David Streets (Argonne National Laboratory) and Michael Glantz prepared an article based on their earlier climate surprises study to examine the concept of climate surprise and its implications for environmental policy making. The paper, "Exploring the Concept of Climate Surprise," was published in Global Environmental Change in FY00.

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Geophysical Statistics Project (GSP)

Richard Katz serves as co-Principal Investigator, along with Joseph Tribbia (NCAR/CGD) and Douglas Nychka (NCAR/GSP) on a five-year grant (renewal started in FY99) from the NSF Division of Mathematical Sciences for a Geophysical Statistics Program at NCAR. Nychka serves as the project leader of GSP. The FY00 accomplishments of GSP are included under the section for the Climate and Global Dynamics Division.

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Handbook of Weather, Climate,
and Water, Societal Aspects Volume

Several members of ESIG have contributed to a special volume (Societal Aspects) of the Handbook of Weather, Climate, and Water. This is the first time that such a volume has been included in this Handbook. Michael Glantz served as the Volume Editor and he, Pielke, and Miller each contributed a chapter to this volume, expected to be published in mid-FY01.

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Network Newsletter

Now in its sixteenth year, this international, multidisciplinary newsletter has witnessed continued growth in its mailing list (now over 3,500 recipients, limited only by the cost of postage). Glantz and Stewart have continued to work on networking research centers, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), universities, institutes, government agencies, and individuals dealing with climate-related impact assessments by producing the quarterly, climate-related impacts Network Newsletter. Approximately 50 percent of the recipients are in North America, and 50 percent are international. The Network Newsletter has been produced quarterly since 1985 in its paper edition. The newsletter was put on line in FY96. NOAA's Office of Global Programs has contributed funds to continue the production of the newsletter for FY01.

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Societal Aspects of Weather Web Site

The Societal Aspects of Weather Web site has been developed over the past several years by Roger Pielke Jr., with assistance in 2000 from Jennifer Oxelson and Roberta Klein, in order to facilitate, encourage, and support the formation of a researcher/user partnership and community of people involved in studying the societal aspects of weather. It serves as a central clearinghouse for on-line resources on this topic and provides needed tools for increased interaction between researchers and users of weather information. It is expected that the primary users of the group will be researchers in weather and societal aspects of weather, producers of weather information and/or forecasts, and other users of weather information. For the site to succeed, users must take part in its continuing development and content by requesting items, additions, and developing resources.

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Weather Policy Resource Guide Electronic Forum

Weather policy has two interrelated components. One is "policies of weather research and decision making." (This includes government policies about weather research, forecast operations, etc.) The other is "weather research for decision making." (This refers to the connection between research and the actions taken in preparation for and response to weather.) The purpose of this list-serv is to provide a forum for discussion and communication among those interested in the educational and research aspects of atmospheric science policy.

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WeatherZine

WeatherZineThe WeatherZine electronic newsletter was developed by Roger Pielke Jr. as a bimonthly, on-line, and email-distributed newsletter for the Societal Aspects of Weather Web site. It contains a summary of recent additions to the site (and links to relevant sections), along with editorials, news, events, and announcements of interest to the community. As of FY00, more than 700 people have subscribed, and many others are reached via the Web and through news groups.

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